back to homepage

Tag "fat"

Resolutions That Can Really Make a Difference

Do New Year’s resolutions really do any good? It depends on what they are and whether you can keep them.

Read More

Losing Weight Safely

Americans trying to lose weight have plenty of company. According to a 1995 report from the Institute of Medicine, tens of millions of Americans are dieting at any given time, spending more than $33 billion yearly on weight-reduction products, such as diet foods and drinks.

Read More

Fat Matters.. But Calories Count

Just because a product is fat free, doesn’t mean it is calorie free. In fact, fat free or reduced fat products can have as many, if not more, calories per serving than regular products. So, yes, you need to watch your fat intake. But remember calories do count.

Read More

Burger King: Nutritional Information

Nutritional information for menu items at Burger King Restaurants.

Read More

Baking With Yogurt

Yogurt, particularly low-fat and non-fat varieties, has a lot to offer health-conscious cooks. Learn about how you can use yogurt to make your baked goodies even better, and healthier!

Read More

Eat Your Omega Three’s

There’s no doubt about it: seafood can be good for your health. Overall, it has less total fat and less saturated fat than meat and poultry. So eating fish regularly may help lower blood cholesterol levels. Moreover, seafood supplies several vitamins and minerals. Recently, there has been interest in the omega-3 fatty acid content of fish, too.

Read More

Setting Goals For Weight Loss

There are lots of reasons for people who are overweight or obese to lose weight. To be healthier. To look better. To feel better. To have more energy. No matter what the reason, successful weight loss and healthy weight management depend on sensible goals and expectations. If you set sensible goals for yourself, chances are you’ll be more likely to meet them and have a better chance of keeping the weight off.

Read More

Top Number Too High in Blood Pressures of People Over Age Fifty

In one of the largest analyses of its kind, researchers found that most middle-aged and older individuals with high blood pressure have a form of the disease in which their systolic pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – is too high, according to a study in the March issue of Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Read More